American Geographical Society Issues “Call for Proposals” for 2015 Fall Symposium

American Geographical Society Issues “Call for Proposals” for 2015 Fall Symposium


Description:  The American Geographical Society has announced that it is issuing a Call for Proposals for its 2015 Fall Symposium to be held the 19th and 20th of November 2015.

 

[New York City, NY] – [April 2, 2015] — The American Geographical Society (AGS) announced today that it is issuing a “Call for Proposals” for the 2015 AGS Fall Symposium to be held the 19th and 20th of November at Columbia University in New York City.  The theme of this year’s Symposium is “Geography 2050:  Exploring Our Future in an Urbanized World”.  Researchers across the country are being solicited to submit proposals for paper and Ignite sessions focused on state-of-the-art research and practice related to urban geography to be presented on the first day of the Symposium.

 

In 2014, AGS mounted an “Expedition to the Future”, and a topic that prominently recurred through much of the dialog was “urbanization.”  An ever increasing proportion of the world’s population will dwell in urban areas by 2050, even as the world’s total population swells by billions.  The geographies of our urban habitats are poised to change radically by 2050, and the implications of this for local, regional, and global decision makers are significant and paramount to our well-being.  The spatial-temporal processes and patterns that will reshape our cities – and the rest of the planet – are many and interrelated, and will manifest differently in different places over time.  In short, there is no single “urban habitat” and it is imperative that we, as a global society, understand the variety and interconnectedness of the world’s towns, cities and mega-cities as they evolve by 2050.

 

The AGS Fall Symposium brings together leaders in business, government, academe, and the social sector that might not otherwise have the opportunity to interact, and provide opportunities for discussion, debate, and collaboration to further the understanding of the future of our cities in the context of a changing planet.  “It is great that many organizations have meetings about the future of cities.  The AGS’s Fall Symposium is the only event that will enable thought leaders from every sector to shine a light on the complex set of urbanization processes that will fundamentally reshape our planet by 2050.” said Dr. Christopher Tucker, creator of MapStory.org and Chair of the AGS Fall Symposium.  “Last year’s Geography 2050 Symposium scanned the horizon for the vital trends reshaping the future geography of our planet, and “urbanization” was repeatedly highlighted as a dominant factor.  It is so important that we have added an additional day to specifically look at the latest research on this critical topic” added Dr. Tucker.

 

For more information on the Fall Symposium, and specifics on the Call for Proposals, go to www.geography2050.org or contact AGS at ags@americangeo.org .

 

Established in 1851, the American Geographical Society (AGS) is the oldest professional geographical organization in the United States.  It is recognized world-wide as a pioneer in geographical research and education in geography for over 163 years.  The mission of AGS is to advance geographic knowledge and the recognition of its importance in the contemporary world.  AGS promotes the use of geography in business, government, science, and education with a goal to enhance the nation’s geographic literacy so as to engender sound public policy, national security, and human well-being worldwide.  AGS is the only organization focused on bringing together academics, business people, those who influence public policy (including leaders in local, state and federal government, not-for-profit organizations and the media), and the general public for the express purpose of furthering the understanding of the role of geography in our lives.  AGS provides leadership to frame the national discussion of the growing importance of geography and geo-spatial tools.  The Society maintains its headquarters in Brooklyn Heights, New York.

 

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