Geography 2050

Geography 2050 – Annual Fall Symposium

 

Check out the theme for 2019:  Borders and a Borderless World

 

Couldn’t make it this year?

No worries, we’ve got you covered. . .

 

2018

Powering Our Future Planet

Coming soon

 

See what you missed at previous symposia

 

2017

The Future of Mobility

Over the past two centuries, nothing has reshaped the geography of our lives more fundamentally than innovations in mobility. The American Geographical Society’s early days were guided by railroad tycoons, steel barons and bankers interested in connecting the American West through an extensive network of railways, enabling unprecedented commerce, communications and settlement. The railroad fundamentally altered the geography of America, and how people thought about the previously distant frontiers that they could now reach by the comfort of rail. Before railroads came ships that connected continents, and canals that connected landscapes. After the railroads came roads, buses and automobiles. Then the dawn of passenger planes, then the interstate highway system, then passenger jets with global reach. This is a continuous process of humans remaking the geography of their planet through innovations in mobility.

Now the Society is looking to the future to think about how new and emerging innovations in mobility will again reshape the geography of our nation and our world. Mobility has become a central issue within today’s technology press, with the exciting prospects presented by the future of driverless cars, trucks, and buses; flying cars and drone delivery; hyperloops and highspeed rail; hoverboards and electric bikes; supersonic jets and commercial space travel; augmented reality and virtual reality/mobility, and even additive manufacturing and 3D printing at the distant end of supply chains. These frontiers in mobility seem to be ripped from the pages of science fiction, yet early examples of each of these exist today. As always happens, a veritable Pandora’s Box of technologies have been unleashed on the world, and the implications for society and its future geography could not be less clear.

Geography2050 is a multi-year strategic dialog about the vital trends that will reshape the geography of our nation and our planet by 2050. In 2017, our Geography2050 Symposium will focus on the Future of Mobility. We will focus on how mobility innovations will reshape our world’s geography, how these innovations change our basic perception of space and time, and how the geospatial revolution will help drive this revolution in mobility. By exploring these vital future trends, the Society seeks to help thought leaders and decision makers from industry, government, academe and the social sector to “get ahead of the curve” so that they can help shape the future of mobility to make the world a better place.

 

VIDEOS
Highlight Reel
Intro Overview
Mobility Lessons From the Past That Inform Our Future
Mobility and the Future Regional Networks
Mobility and the City of the Future
Awards Ceremony
Investment in, Ownership of, and Access to the Future of Mobility in Different Geographies
A Conversation with Brian McClendon and John Hanke
The Gamechanger Electric, Shared, and Automated
Parag Khanna Keynote Speech
Ignite Talks 1
Mapping and Managing the Skies Above
ow Geospatial Technologies Are Shaping the Future and Vice Versa!
Ignite Talks 2/strong>
Prospectus for the Coming Year

 

2016

Envisioning a Sustainable Planet

The world of 2050 will be radically different. It is not at all clear how we will get there from here or how we should navigate through the uncharted waters of the future. Climate change, urbanization, rapid expansion of the Internet and the availability and use of information, the continued evolution of human identity, and changing modes of commerce, cooperation, and conflict from local to global scales are just some of the many trends influencing the future. Each poses many challenges and opportunities for how we perceive and shape our world’s geography now and in coming decades.

To help lay the foundation for exploring these local, regional and global challenges—and the investments in technology, data, laws, policies, and capacities needed to improve our ability to navigate through them—the American Geographical Society is collaborating with the Earth Institute, Columbia University to organize an “Expedition to the Future.”

VIDEOS
Conservation and Indigenous Peoples
Dr. Vince McElhinny
Conservation International

 

How Geospatial Technology Can Enhance Sustainability and Security
Dr. Alexander Murphy
University of Oregon
Iconic Species Sharks, Birds, Elephants and Buffalo
Dr. John Konarski III
CEO, American Geographical Society

 

Success in Sustainability in 2050
Mr. Anthony Quartararo
Spatial Networks, Inc.

 

Living Oceans for the Blue Planet
Dr. Serge Dedina
Mayor, Imperial Beach, CA

 

What if People Mattered
Dr. Robert Chen
Columbia University

 

Powering Our Future
Dr. Wesley Reisser
US Department of State

 

Remote Sensing And the Impact on Sustainability
Mr. Al di Leonardo
Radiant Group

 

Protection, Management, and Restoration of Future Forests
The Near-Horizon Future of Conservation and the National Parks
Dr. Gary Machlis
US National Park Service

2015

Exploring Our Future in an Urbanized World

In 2014, AGS mounted an “Expedition to the Future”, and a topic that prominently recurred through much of the dialog was “urbanization.” An ever increasing proportion of the world’s population will dwell in urban areas by 2050, even as the world’s total population swells by billions. The geographies of our urban habitats are poised to change radically by 2050, and the implications of this for local, regional, and global decision makers are significant and paramount to our well-being. The spatial-temporal processes and patterns that will reshape our cities – and the rest of the planet – are many and interrelated, and will manifest differently in different places over time. In short, there is no single “urban habitat” and it is imperative that we, as a global society, understand the variety and interconnectedness of the world’s towns, cities and mega-cities as they evolve by 2050

The AGS Fall Symposium brings together leaders in business, government, science, and education that might not otherwise have the opportunity to interact, and provide opportunities for discussion, debate, and collaboration to further the understanding of the future of our cities.

Big City = Big Data
Mr. Anthony Quartararo
CEO, Spatial Networks

The Future of Vertical Farming
Dr. Dickson Despommier
Columbia University

Urban Social Research & Technology Design
Mr. Mitchell Sipus
Co-founder, Symkala

The Geographic Implications of Migration and Resettlement
Dr. Marie Price
Councilor, AGS

The Future of Urbanization
West Point Scholars

Sensing Urban Change From Above
Mr. Jeffrey Harris
Chairman of the Board, USGIF

Urban Sustainbility
Dr. David Kaplan
Councilor, AGS

Keynote Address
Dr. Joan Clos
Executive Director, UN-Habitat
Investing in an Urban Future
Ms. Adrianne Kadzinski
Mr. Christopher Jones
Mr. Dylan Hixon
Mr. Josh Wilkes

The Future Geography of Economic Exclusion and Integration
Dr. Deborah Popper
Vice-President, AGS

Emerging Urban Forms
Dr. Christopher Tucker
Councilor, AGS

Cities at Risk of Disaster
Dr. Robert Chen
Councilor, AGS

The Future Role of Cities in the Geo-Strateigc Landscape
Ms. Susan Gordon
Deputy Director, NGA

2014

Mounting an Expedition to the Future

The world of 2050 will be radically different. It is not at all clear how we will get there from here or how we should navigate through the uncharted waters of the future. Climate change, urbanization, rapid expansion of the Internet and the availability and use of information, the continued evolution of human identity, and changing modes of commerce, cooperation, and conflict from local to global scales are just some of the many trends influencing the future. Each poses many challenges and opportunities for how we perceive and shape our world’s geography now and in coming decades.

To help lay the foundation for exploring these local, regional and global challenges—and the investments in technology, data, laws, policies, and capacities needed to improve our ability to navigate through them—the American Geographical Society is collaborating with the Earth Institute, Columbia University to organize an “Expedition to the Future.”

VIDEOS
Welcome to Geography 2050
Dr. Christopher Tucker
Board Member, AGS
Geography’s Future
Dr. Jerry Dobson
AGS President
Identity
Prof. Alexander Murphy
University of Oregon
Health
Ms. Mary Elizabeth Kruk
Columbia University
Population
Prof. Deborah Balk
Institute for Demographic Research
Climate Change
Dr. D. James Baker
Clinton Climate Initiative